Mar 192012
 

 When I heard that Chanel was re-releasing Chanel Pink Explosion (#64/ Fard a Joues Poudre Pink Explosion)($43), I didn’t realize that the color had been reformulated. If you’ve been watching Chanel for a while, Chanel originally released Pink Explosion as part of the Fall 2010 makeup collection in a baked format (the former version is reviewed here and here). Currently, it is being re-released into a new, powder texture that is common for Chanel U.S. releases on the Joues Contraste formula.  For an overview of the differences between the U.S. and non-U.S. formulas, see this post. Generally, this powder formula has a softer texture that is much easier to pick up on a brush. Also, the U.S. powder Joues Contrastes give a lovely, glowing look to the face. The baked, non-U.S. formulas requires a stiffer brush and tend to have a more obvious shine/sparkle. As you can see in the above picture, the new Pink Explosion has a deeper pink hue, with subtle sparkle, and a touch of cherry red (compared to the softer, lighter pink of the former version).

Both the former and current version have the same name–Pink Explosion–and designation number, #64. Both are made in France. How can you tell the difference? For one thing, the older version that I have in my drawer is numbered #2605, and the new one is numbered #4401. Here is a comparison of the back of the compacts that show the precise number designations:

Also, the older version has 0.14 oz. and the newer one has 0.21 oz. of product. As you can see, the new Pink Explosion has the hatch marks of the powder formulation, a smooth texture and a slight touch of sparkle:

 A bit closer:

 

Here is a swatch comparison between the old and new Chanel Pink Explosions. I’ve also added a comparison with Chanel Tumulte (reviewed here), as well as Chanel Rose Tourbillon (reviewed here).

 One more, using slightly different lighting:

As you can see, the new Pink Explosion is slightly deeper in its pink tone. Working with the new formula is certainly easier, as you can imagine. The softer Chanel powder blush is a dream to apply with any standard powder brush. By comparison, the new Pink Explosion is deeper than Chanel Tumulte, and less red and lighter than Chanel Rose Tourbillon.

As with my other Chanel blush reviews, more will be posted as I work with the formula.

Please follow us on....

Jul 112011
 

Chanel Joues Contraste in Rose Tourbillon ($43 at Nordstrom Anniversary 2011/ # 67) is a candy pink confection of a blush.  If you love fresh pinks, it is very difficult to resist.  This is a fantastic color, has a refined texture, and there is a beautiful glowing and natural quality when applied.

This cool pink is a gorgeous color when worn.  Although there are some sparkles in the pan, the look when applied is very natural and glowy.  That famous Joues Contraste texture works the magic with this amazingly versatile color.  As with any color this strong, you will want to focus the color on a portion of the cheek.  If you place in the upper cheek, the contour, or brush it back near the hairline, you will get a pretty, flushed and lovely glow.

Some comparisons–here, you can see it is cooler than the limited edition Chanel Joues Contraste Pink Explosion (reviewed here, no longer available).  However, Rose Tourbillon is more pigmented than Pink Explosion–that is, this swatch has several layers of Pink Explosion built up compared to 1-2 layers of Rose Tourbillon.   Next is Chanel Joues Contraste Turbulent (reviewed here, no longer available).  At the end, I swatched Chanel Joues Contraste in Rose Petale (reviewed here) so you would have a comparison to a warmer, peachy-pink blush.

 

Liz did a look using Rose Turbulent applied lightly over foundation (no bronzer).

Here, Liz is wearing the Chanel Topkaki eyeshadow palette (reviewed here) and Chanel Rouge Allure lipstick in Joyeuse (reviewed here.  We’ll do a more detailed post breaking down her application after we finish Le Blanc de Chanel.

 

Please follow us on....