Mar 192012
 

 When I heard that Chanel was re-releasing Chanel Pink Explosion (#64/ Fard a Joues Poudre Pink Explosion)($43), I didn’t realize that the color had been reformulated. If you’ve been watching Chanel for a while, Chanel originally released Pink Explosion as part of the Fall 2010 makeup collection in a baked format (the former version is reviewed here and here). Currently, it is being re-released into a new, powder texture that is common for Chanel U.S. releases on the Joues Contraste formula.  For an overview of the differences between the U.S. and non-U.S. formulas, see this post. Generally, this powder formula has a softer texture that is much easier to pick up on a brush. Also, the U.S. powder Joues Contrastes give a lovely, glowing look to the face. The baked, non-U.S. formulas requires a stiffer brush and tend to have a more obvious shine/sparkle. As you can see in the above picture, the new Pink Explosion has a deeper pink hue, with subtle sparkle, and a touch of cherry red (compared to the softer, lighter pink of the former version).

Both the former and current version have the same name–Pink Explosion–and designation number, #64. Both are made in France. How can you tell the difference? For one thing, the older version that I have in my drawer is numbered #2605, and the new one is numbered #4401. Here is a comparison of the back of the compacts that show the precise number designations:

Also, the older version has 0.14 oz. and the newer one has 0.21 oz. of product. As you can see, the new Pink Explosion has the hatch marks of the powder formulation, a smooth texture and a slight touch of sparkle:

 A bit closer:

 

Here is a swatch comparison between the old and new Chanel Pink Explosions. I’ve also added a comparison with Chanel Tumulte (reviewed here), as well as Chanel Rose Tourbillon (reviewed here).

 One more, using slightly different lighting:

As you can see, the new Pink Explosion is slightly deeper in its pink tone. Working with the new formula is certainly easier, as you can imagine. The softer Chanel powder blush is a dream to apply with any standard powder brush. By comparison, the new Pink Explosion is deeper than Chanel Tumulte, and less red and lighter than Chanel Rose Tourbillon.

As with my other Chanel blush reviews, more will be posted as I work with the formula.

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Jul 082010
 

Chanel’s Fall 2010 collection includes several clear pink and peach-toned colors to compliment the smoky eyeshadows and deeply colored blushes that are in this same release.  One of the ones that caught my eye is Pink Teaser Glossimer #142 ($27)(limited edition).  Pink Explosion is the most opaque gloss from this collection and has a similar medium pink feel as Pink Explosion blush.

Chanel Glossimers have a gel-like texture that has dimension and staying power without a sticky feel.  When someone asks me for a duplicate for a Chanel Glossimer, I cannot answer them.  If you own any, you already know that they have a depth and dimension that I have not found in less expensive glosses. Glossimers have no scent or smell.

Here, Liz is wearing Chanel Lift Lumiere foundation in Ivoire (Intensity 1.0) topped with Caron translucent powder, Maybelline Colossal mascara, Prestige Total Intensity liner in Deepest Black, along with Chanel Pink Explosion blush and Pink Teaser Glossimer.

This shows Pink Explosion blush, where Liz applied this lightly to the apples of the cheek to give a glow:

Both Pink Teaser and Pink Explosion are universal colors that can be worn year-round.  Both seemed fine to wear yesterday, even in July.  Of course, these colors will look beautiful in the Fall and Winter, when paired with the deeper smoky colors of those seasons.

Karlasugar has swatched the rest of Chanel’s Fall 2010 lip collection here.


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Jul 052010
 

Chanel’s Les Contrastes collection includes Pink Explosion #64 Joues Contraste Blush ($42) (Fard a Joues Poudre Powder Blush).  I knew that I would love Pink Explosion before I ever saw it, when I called Bergdorf’s counter in New York City and they had sold out.

Let’s review here.  First, it’s Chanel.  Second, it’s called “Pink Explosion.”  Third, Bergdorf’s sold out in one week.  The evidence was piling up pretty fast.

Yes, I know that this blush is not the same as the U.S.-textured Joues Contrastes of the past.  Yes, I can see that there are tiny glitter bits in the pan.  And Chanel has released two incredible cool pinks already- Narcisse and Turbulent.  Bobbi Brown makes fabulous pinks.  And don’t get me started on Shu Uemura’s Glow-ons.  That’s tough competition.

Chanel Pink Explosion

Pink Explosion is medium deep cool pink.  Pink Explosion is between Narcisse (light, less pigmented) and Turbulent (deeper, more pigmented). And I have been hoping for a blush like Pink Explosion for a long, long time.

I happen to love cool pinks.  My skin tone is light (NC15/Cameo) and warm.  When I wear foundation, a cool pink stands out from my warmer skin tone.  It brings out the blue in my eyes.  When I wear bronzer, it gives some needed coolness to the warmth of the bronzer.  It keeps me from looking too warm.

Your coloring and preferences may vary from mine, but personally, I love Pink Explosion.  I find it gives me a very fresh, glowing look that is noticeable but not overwhelming.  I applied this with a MAC blush brush and was very pleased with the results.  I can see using this one up.

Swatch applied with a blush brush:

Heavy swatch:

If you are considering investing in Pink Explosion, you may already know that not all bloggers are in agreement about Pink Explosion.  For example, Sabrina at The Beauty Look Book, who I respect, gave Pink Explosion a less than satisfactory review.   For me, Narcisse was too light and Turbulent too pigmented (and therefore difficult to work with).  I find Pink Explosion a stunning pink that is very easy to use, looks very polished, but has a little fashionable kick that I really love.

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