Apr 042013
 

Guerlain Jambes de Gazelle 1

This summer brings Guerlain’s Terracotta Jambes de Gazelle Cooling Bronze Mist ($59/ 3.38 oz/ 100 ml). This is a light, temporary tanner meant for the face and body. It has a spray top so that the colored liquid is controllable. 

Guerlain Jambes des Gazelles 2

As with most Guerlain products, Jambes de Gazelle is lushly scented with a sort of luxurious tropical with a hint of coconut. There is hydrating effect, it leaves skin with a slight gleam of moisture.  I don’t see any embedded shimmer or highlighter. It leaves skin lightly tanned on first spray, and can be built up for more intensity. It takes roughly a minute or two to dry, and I haven’t noticed any transferring once the liquid sets.

Guerlain Jambes de Gazelle 2

Here’s the final effect of the spray that we used in the photograph, above:

Guerlain Jambes de Gazelle

I actually didn’t notice any cooling sensation with my room-temperature bottle. I suspect that I would need to refrigerate first. Some may find the price tag a little high for the effect, however, I’m happy with the product. There’s something that I find very mood-elevating about Guerlain’s scents (in my spare time, I’m obsessing about which Guerlain fragrance must be on my shelf—any ideas?). Also, I like the “your skin but tanned and glowy” effect that doesn’t depend on artificial shimmer bits which can go all sorts of wrong in direct sunlight. 

Bottom line, Guerlain Jambes de Gazelle gives a believable, temporary glow that is a nice transition product as we head toward summer.

This post contains affiliate links (for more information, see About Cafe Makeup).

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May 272012
 

Guerlain by Emilio Pucci Terra Azzurra Bronzer & Blush ($75/ .56 oz.) is Guerlain’s complex and beautiful summer offering. This product displays a very high level of care, design, and attention. In many ways, the beauty of the product was thoughtful in both its creation, display, and the high quality of this finely-milled, beautiful powder. First, the presentation includes a blue-Pucci patterned inner box and fabric sleeve.

The bronzer is housed in a wood-composite round compact, which is comparatively lightweight but still substantial enough to feel luxurious.

The domed compact is embossed with lettering “Geurlain by Emilio Pucci” and relies on a magnet closure:

The compact has a mirror inside. The bronzer pattern includes a narrow strip of highlighter on the outer edge, two blush strips (one orange, one fuchsia violet), and a large section of a pale, pearly bronzer.

It’s very easy to pick up the blush separately from the bronzer on a brush. However, it’s nearly impossible to pick up the highlighter or bronzer strips separately unless one uses an unlikely choice, such an eyeshadow brush.

 

The compact is large, in line with other limited edition Guerlain bronzers of years past that come in similar compacts:

Swatches of the highlighter, the two blushes and the bronzer, and then all products mixed. I found that the blushes are highly pigmented, and the bronzer is subtle. When the powders are mixed, the blushes strongly predominate the mix.  The combination of the orange and violet seem to create a fruit punch color that reminds me a bit of the formerly released Geurlain Series Noir Blush G.

As you can see, the bronzer is golden and light. Those with deeper skin tones may find that the bronzer is too light for their skin tone. On Megan, you can see how the blush tones predominate. I found a similar effect on me:

The quality of the product is amazing. There’s really no discussion that Guerlain is a master in powdered bronzer, and this bears all of the hallmarks of a beautiful presentation treasure. I typically use a small headed brush (a MAC 168) to apply the bronzer first, and then the blush on the upper cheek. As an all-in-one product, it’s a beautiful compact to place on your makeup table. Although the pouch is fun, this isn’t something that I’d travel with as the top might come loose under the rigors of airline baggage travel (although I would put it into an overnight bag).

Bottom line: gorgeous.

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Jun 032011
 

Some quick pictures of Guerlain’s Terracotta Mosaic Face and Body Bronzer ($69/ about .5 ounce).  This is a mix of several different brown and tan colors, topped with a gold overspray on portions of the surface.  Typical of many body bronzers, this is 4 1/2″ across, housed in a slim compact with the transparent lid.

As you can see, the surface shows the mix of different colored browns, each a different mosaic “tile” that creates the Guerlain “G” logo.

There is a soft, perfumed scent to the compact.  It is more lightweight than the heavier, mirrored .68 ounce (more product) body bronzer released by Guerlain a few years ago with the Orient collection (on the right):

I’m heading out of town again for several days (see, I told you that Liz and I are busy!).  In the meantime, take a look at swatches of this palette at Natural n Chic’s makeup blog at this link.

 

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Apr 172011
 

Guerlain Summer 2011 includes Terra Inca ($70- Poudre Sublimatrice / Sublime Radiance Powder), a softly bronzed illuminating powder.  Every summer, Guerlain has introduced a stunning bronzing powder. As has been Guerlain’s tradition, the pan size every year is quite large.  At $70, this year’s Inca is the largest offering in recent memory at .51 ounces (14.5 g).  A quick review of their earlier offerings shows that this is almost twice as large as a few years ago, and one-third larger than last year’s.  This large size is very practical for a product that can be used for both the face and body.

The packaging is a sleek, low-profile back case with a gorgeous sunburst engraving on the outside.  I was quite happy to see that this is not made of cardboard, it has the feel of wood or a wood composite.  It’s beautifully executed, and designed as a richly-textured, sturdy accent to your makeup table.

The top is not hinged, rather it pulls off entirely to reveal a large, usable mirror underneath.  Like Guerlain’s other elaborate summer offerings, these are not made for travel.  When closed, the Terra Inca lid is held in place with three small magnets–one pair of these magnets is pictured just below.  These magnets release with slight pressure, which is wonderful for a makeup counter but not for a suitcase.  If you wish for something on-the-go, as you likely know Guerlain makes gorgeous Terracotta bronzers in compacts that are better alternatives for travel.

This bronzer is made of a intricately carved powder–really, it’s quite beautiful in its execution.

As you can see, the pan holds a powder that has a fair amount of glow and shimmer.  Here is another picture:

Here is a very close look at the beautiful workmanship on the top of the pan, which shows the pearly quality of this beautiful powder.  It’s been my experience that Guerlain is a company that has a particularly sophisticated understanding of powders, as well as bronzers.  I find myself unable to miss their annual summer bronzers, because really the best of both worlds comes together in these offerings.  As you can see, this powder catches the light beautifully, a quality which translates when worn on the skin:

My general sense is that this year’s Terra Inca is primarily designed for those with lighter skin tones.  Although deeper in tone than Guerlain Terracotta Light Sheer Bronzing Powder, it is gently tinted although buildable.  If you are looking for something in the range of Nars Casino, or are deeper in tone than MAC NC 40, this is something you would need to try at a counter before purchasing.

Here is Terra Inca on Liz, who is a Mac NC15/ Chanel Cameo-Ivoire Intensity 1.0.  She applied it lightly all over the face, then added more over the cheek area.  She topped Terra Inca with a touch of Chanel Pink Explosion blush (reviewed here).

Some of you may have seen Liz’s reaction on Facebook to Guerlain’s Terra Inca.  Generally, we both concur that Terra Inca is an excellent bronzer.  It has a beautifully natural, yet pearly texture that adds a glow and tone to the skin that looks quite beautiful (no one would mistake Liz’s bronzing technique for that used by the Jersey Shore’s Snooki, that’s certain).  In a one-to-one comparison, we should note that we preferred Dior’s Nude Glow Summer Powder in Aurora (reviewed here, $46) over Terra Inca.

We’ll post more thoughts tomorrow, although for now we found that Dior’s Aurora is smaller in size (about .35 ounces), although less expensive ($46 for Dior, and $70 for Guerlain).  We liked the pink tinge that Aurora gives for a “just out from the sun” look particularly on the face.  Although we appreciated the beauty of Guerlain’s packaging, we liked Dior’s Aurora compact better for travel.  Guerlain’s Terra Inca is more traditional bronzer color, which means adding a touch of blush on top.  None is necessary for Dior’s in our opinion.  We found that both gave an excellent glow.  We should also note that Liz wore Guerlain’s Terra Inca all day in the hot sun (over sunblock and foundation), she was complimented several times for her skin texture, glow and overall look.  I completely concur, Guerlain’s Terra Inca was absolutely beautiful on Liz.  Also, keep in mind that Guerlain’s is designed for both face and body.  Dior’s Aurora is for the face.

We both highly recommend Guerlain’s Terra Inca, but if you must choose just one, stay tuned for tomorrow’s more in-depth review of Dior’s Aurora.

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Jun 242010
 

Guerlain’s Terracotta Light Summer Bronzing Powder in Blondes Hâlées ($50) is a reformulation of its formerly-released Terracotta Light Sheer Bronzing Powder.  Although the products look similar at first glance, the formula, color and tone of the products are quite different.

As both versions are still being sold, and it is worth a pause so that we can tell the difference.

The packaging of both is nearly identical.  There are two differences to look for:  First, the older versions are called “Blondes” and “Brunettes.”  The new versions are called “Blondes Hâlées” and “Brunettes Hâlées.”   Second, the limited edition version for Summer 201 uses the phrase “Summer Bronzing Powder” on the packaging and compact.  The older version does not.  Also, the new Hâlées have a slight pebbled look to the ornate embedded logo on the compact.  The older version is simpler, without the dotted texture that surrounds the swirling, embedded “G’s.”

This review focuses on Blondes Hâlées, which I recently purchased and compared to my former Blondes.

The primary differences are:

  • The texture of Blondes Hâlées is much softer and easier to pick up on the brush.  The older Blondes seems quite hard by comparison.
  • Blondes Hâlées is a deeper, darker color.
  • Blondes Hâlées is a more intense, more dramatic bronzer.
  • Blondes Hâlées has redder undertones, which is more akin to a tiny pink-red that looks more like sun-exposed “tan with a touch of red”.
  • The older Blondes has a sheerer golden tone.

Hare side-by-side swatches:

I prefer the new formulation.  Blondes Hâlées has a beautiful natural tone with a pretty golden shimmer.  I had to beat the pigment out of the former Blondes to get sheer coverage. Blondes Hâlées gives a more natural look and is much easier to work with.

Here is a comparison — on the left, no bronzer.  On the right, Blondes Hâlées:

Although Guerlain Blondes Hâlées is a deeper color tone, I find the effect quite natural.  Her skin takes on a pink tone, without any trace of orange.

Below, Liz added a pop of pink blush (Bobbi Brown French Pink) on top of Blondes Hâlées:

So, between the Edward Bess Daydream that I reviewed last and the Guerlain, which do you prefer?

 

 

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